Is the Situational Leader's style realistic?

Intro
The Situational Leadership is a model that proposes that the most effective Leadership behaviour depends on the situation. The main idea of this model is that leaders must be flexible and adapt their Leadership behaviour according to the competence and motivation level of their subordinates




1. Definition of the Situational Leader: main characteristics

 The Situational Leader adapts his style between the following four main situations/behaviours:

  1. Directive Style (S1): This style is characterized by one-way communication where the leader tells their subordinates what to do and how to do it. This style is appropriate when subordinates lack competence but have high motivation.

  2. Persuasive Style (S2): This style is characterized by two-way communication where the leader provides directions but is also open to receiving feedback. This style is appropriate when subordinates lack competence but have high motivation.

  3. Participative Style (S3): This style is characterized by two-way communication where the leader shares decisions with subordinates. This style is appropriate when subordinates have high competence but lack motivation.

  4. Delegative Style (S4): This style is characterized by one-way communication where the leader lets their subordinates make their own decisions. This style is appropriate when subordinates have high competence and high motivation.




2. Origins of Situational Leadership

 The Situational Leadership Theory was developed by Paul Hersey and Ken Blanchard in the 1960s. Originally, it was known as the "Life Cycle Theory of Leadership." In 1971, after many years of research and development, Hersey and Blanchard introduced the Situational Leadership Theory.

The Situational Leadership Theory is based on the idea that the most effective Leadership behaviour depends on the situation. The model identifies two main leader behaviors: supportive behavior and directive behavior. Leaders must adjust these behaviors according to the competence and motivation level of their subordinates.

In 1985, Ken Blanchard introduced some modifications to the original model and published "The One Minute Manager," a book that presents the concepts of Situational Leadership in a simple and easy-to-understand manner. Since then, the Situational Leadership Theory has continued to evolve and has been used in many different contexts, including business, education, healthcare, and sports.

Today, the Situational Leadership Theory is one of the most used and respected Leadership models in the world. It has been adapted and modified by numerous researchers and practitioners, and continues to be an active subject of research and application.


3 Strengths and issues of the Situational Leadership

3.1 Strengths

The strengths of the Situational Leader include:

  1. Flexibility: The Situational Leader is able to adapt their style according to the situation and the individual needs of their subordinates. This makes them highly effective in a variety of contexts and situations.

  2. Focus on subordinate development: The Situational Leadership model emphasises the development of subordinates' skills and abilities. The leader assesses the needs of their subordinates and adjusts their behaviour to help them develop and reach their full potential.

  3. Efficiency: By adapting their leadership behaviour, situational leaders can improve the overall performance of the team or organisation.

  4. Improved relationships: The model encourages leaders to establish strong and supportive relationships with their subordinates, which can enhance communication and collaboration within the team or organisation.

  5. Consideration of diversity: Situational Leadership recognises that subordinates are different and have different needs. This can be particularly useful in diverse work environments.

  6. Simplicity of the model: The Situational Leadership model is conceptually simple, making it accessible to a wide range of people. However, it is important to note that the practical implementation of the model can be complex, requiring an accurate assessment of the situation and the individual needs of subordinates, as well as a clear understanding of how to adapt one's leadership behaviour accordingly.

In summary, Situational Leadership offers a flexible and practical approach to Leadership that can be used to improve subordinate performance, strengthen relationships, and foster a positive work environment.



3.2 Critiques or issues of Situational Leadership

 The Situational Leadership is a flexible model that proposes adapting one's Leadership behaviour according to the needs of their subordinates and the situation. However, it can present certain challenges or problems for the leader:

  1. Difficulty in assessment: One of the challenges of Situational Leadership is accurately assessing the competence and motivation levels of subordinates. An inaccurate assessment can lead to adopting an inappropriate Leadership behaviour, which can harm the relationship between the leader and the subordinate and affect the latter's performance.

  2. Lack of consistency: Situational Leadership requires frequently changing Leadership behaviours, which can be perceived by some subordinates as a lack of consistency. This perception can affect the subordinates' trust in the leader.

  3. Skill requirements: Situational Leadership requires the leader to be competent in a variety of Leadership types and be able to switch from one style to another according to the situation. This can be demanding in terms of skills and flexibility.

  4. Lack of clarity: The frequent change of Leadership behaviour can sometimes create confusion among subordinates as to what is expected of them. This can affect their performance and job satisfaction.

  5. Risk of favoritism: Situational Leadership can sometimes be perceived as favoring certain subordinates over others, based on their competence and motivation levels. This perception can create tensions within the team.

  6. Lack of long-term vision: Some critics of Situational Leadership argue that this model is too focused on the short term and does not sufficiently take into account the organization's long-term vision and strategy.



4. Situations in which the Situational Leader style is suitable

 The Situational Leadership is well suited to a variety of situations, especially those where collaboration, employee development, and the creation of a positive working environment are priorities. Here are some examples of situations where Situational Leadership can be particularly effective:

  1. Situations requiring rapid adaptation: Situational Leaders are able to quickly adapt to constantly changing situations and meet the individual needs of their subordinates.

  2. Innovative and growing environments: Situational Leadership is particularly suitable for organisations in growth phases or that require innovation, as it allows for a flexible and personalised approach to leadership.

  3. Highly collaborative teams: Situational Leadership works well in environments where collaboration and teamwork are essential. The Situational Leader can create an environment of trust and mutual respect that fosters collaboration and innovation.

  4. Organisations focused on employee development: Situational Leadership is well suited to organisations that value the development and growth of employees. The Situational Leader can create opportunities for professional development for employees and help them reach their full potential.

  5. Value-driven work environments: Situational Leadership is particularly effective in organisations that have a strong value-driven culture and seek to promote a positive work ethic.

  6. Non-profit organisations and community organisations: Situational Leadership is well suited to non-profit organisations and community organisations that seek to serve a broader social or community purpose. The Situational Leader can help mobilise and inspire employees and volunteers around a common mission.

  7. Family businesses: Situational Leadership can also be effective in family businesses where personal relationships and the preservation of a family culture are important. The Situational Leader can help maintain positive relationships while guiding the company towards its goals.




5. Situations in which the Situational Leader style is not suitable

 The Situational Leadership may be less suitable in some situations, including:

  1. Lack of time: Situational Leadership requires constant assessment of subordinates' needs and the adaptation of the Leadership behaviour accordingly. In situations where time is limited, this can prove to be difficult.

  2. Very experienced subordinates: In teams composed of very experienced and autonomous members, Situational Leadership can be perceived as too interventionist or paternalistic.

  3. Highly structured environments: In organisations where roles and processes are highly structured and where there is little room for flexibility, Situational Leadership can be difficult to implement.

  4. Less experienced leaders: For leaders who lack experience, it can be difficult to accurately diagnose the skill and motivation levels of subordinates and adapt their Leadership style accordingly.




6. Conclusion: nowadays, Situational Leadership is well-suited but challenging to adopt

Situational LeadershipThe Situational Leadership is generally considered to be a good Leadership because it is flexible and adaptable, and because it emphasises meeting the individual needs of colleagues.

The current environment, characterised by a rapid pace of change, diverse work teams, and increasingly flexible organisational structures, is conducive to the application of the Situational Leadership style. Indeed, today's leaders must be able to adapt quickly to constantly evolving situations and meet the needs of their subordinates.

However, there are challenges and difficulties inherent in this type of Leadership. Adopting situational Leadership can be demanding due to the need to constantly assess the needs of colleagues and adjust one's Leadership behaviour accordingly. This requires great skill in communication, people assessment, and adaptability. Additionally, it can sometimes be difficult to maintain consistency and clarity in one's Leadership, which can potentially create confusion among colleagues.

Are you a good Leader ?
 
Find out if your leadership style is well adapted to your employees by answering Wevalgo's self-assessments

Confirm your result by inviting those around you to assess you

Click on the following button to start

 
You will benefit from the expertise of management consultants who have coached thousands of managers around the world. Wevalgo puts this know-how, secretly guarded by traditional consultancies, at your service.


×
Stay Informed

When you subscribe to the blog, we will send you an e-mail when there are new updates on the site so you wouldn't miss them.

Related Posts

 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Thursday, 13 June 2024